Croatia has unleashed a true maelstrom of creativity upon the Eurovision stage in Liverpool with Let 3’s unapologetically bold entry, “Mama ŠČ!”.

This isn’t just another song in the lineup; it’s a full-blown performance art piece, wrapped in the trappings of a rock concert, served with a side of satirical genius.

Let 3, the masterminds behind this audacious act, are no strangers to the limelight, and their selection to represent Croatia marks a thrilling chapter in Eurovision’s storied history.

Prepare to be whisked away on a journey through the unexpected as we delve into the intricate layers of Let 3’s Eurovision spectacle.

From the strategic madness of their stage presence to the intricate web of satire woven through their lyrics, this article will explore all the facets that make “Mama ŠČ!” a standout entry.

We’ll analyze the song, dissect the performance, and even provide you with the lyrics, so you can get up close and personal with Croatia’s most daring Eurovision bet yet.

So, start up your traktora and brace yourself for an article that’s as energetic and insightful as the performance itself.

Let’s dive into the wild world of Let 3 and discover why their entry has become the Eurovision legend that it is!

Who is Let 3?

Let 3 is a Croatian rock band known for their provocative and often theatrical performances, pushing the boundaries of music and performance art.

With a career spanning over three decades, Let 3 are celebrated for their unique blend of rock and avant-garde antics, coupled with a healthy dose of humor and satire.

Their selection to represent Croatia at the Eurovision Song Contest 2023 is a testament to their enduring appeal and their ability to make any audience take notice.

Of course, it wouldn’t be Let 3 without a bit of controversy…

The band’s reputation for innovation and their politically charged messages make them a bold choice for Eurovision, a platform that often features more mainstream and radio-friendly acts.

Croatia has been in a bit of a slump, having not qualified for a Grand Final since 2017 with Jacques Houdek.

Let 3’s selection signifies the country’s desire to make a strong statement at the contest, showcasing a piece that is both edgy and artistically challenging.

In a way, “Mama ŠČ!” carries the essence of Let 3’s identity, with its thought-provoking lyrics and dynamic presentation. It’s a track that aims to heal the world from hate and stupidity, as the band has expressed. This aligns with the Eurovision spirit of unity and diversity, making their entry not just a song, but a message to the world.

The excitement surrounding Let 3’s participation in Eurovision 2023 speaks to the anticipation of fans eager to see how their unconventional style will translate to the international stage.

Their selection and qualification to the Grand Final in Liverpool is a bold move for Croatia, one that paid off with a memorable performance that stands out in the history of the contest.

The band’s artistic integrity and fearless approach to music make them a Eurovision act to watch out for!

Song Analysis – “Mama ŠČ!”

There are so many layers here that one could probably write a book about this performance. So we’ll focus on the main elements of the song.

At its core, “Mama ŠČ” by Let 3 is a satirical piece that uses vivid imagery and repetition to critique and mock figures of authority, specifically dictators and warmongers, by portraying them as childishly petulant and spoiled.

The recurring phrase “Mommy bought the tractor” is a direct reference to an actual event where Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko gifted a tractor to Russian President Vladimir Putin. This is meant to symbolize the often absurd and superficial gestures among leaders that can have deeper political implications.

The repetition of “Mommy bought the tractor” followed by the exclamation of “ŠČ!” sets a tone of triviality, suggesting that the leaders’ actions are as simplistic and meaningless as a child showing off a new toy.

This trivialization is further emphasized by the use of the term “Armageddon-granny,” which could be interpreted as a mockery of the grave consequences of war, reduced to child’s play.

The lines “Mommy kissed the moron,” and the various iterations of “psychopath” (little, evil, alligator) serve to infantilize and dehumanize these figures, stripping them of their gravitas and exposing the pettiness and cruelty of their actions.

Referring to war as something one goes to play at, like a game, underscores the reckless and cavalier attitude that the song attributes to these leaders.

The bizarre inclusion of the oddly intense alphabet sequence “A B C Č Ć D DŽ Đ E F G H I J K L LJ M N NJ O P R S Š T U V Z Ž” could be interpreted as a metaphor for the building blocks of language and communication. Perhaps, it is suggesting that the language of these leaders is simplistic or that they’re learning the ‘ABCs’ of tyranny and conflict.

Overall, the song uses dark humor and stark imagery to convey its message, painting a picture of leaders as immature, dangerous individuals playing with the lives of others as if they were mere toys in a sandbox.

The consistent refrain “Mommy, I’m going to war ,” juxtaposed with the childish language and the absurdity of the tractor reference, creates a powerful commentary on the nature of power and the folly of war.

If you want an especially deep dive, Matt and his team over at Overthinking It did an incredible video breaking down all (or at least a huge amount) of the insane details in “Mama ŠČ!”.

You can watch that here:

Overall Impression

Croatia’s Let 3 has just redefined the word ‘spectacle’ with their iconic entry “Mama ŠČ!”.

At first glance, you might be tempted to dismiss their performance as a whirlwind of madness, a wild ride into the realm of the absurd. But don’t be fooled—beneath the surface of this seemingly chaotic extravaganza lies a brilliant tapestry of satire that’s as sharp as it is subtle.

It’s a song that cleverly wraps social commentary in a package of entertainment, making it one of the most delightfully complex acts Eurovision has ever seen.

Indeed, “Mama ŠČ!” isn’t for the faint of heart or those wedded to the conventional. It’s a performance that polarizes, a love-it-or-hate-it affair that knows exactly how to grab the spotlight and hold it tight.

In a contest where blending in is the kiss of death, Let 3 stands out with a neon-lit exclamation point.

The juries may not have responded favorably, but the televote spoke volumes, resonating with viewers across the continent who were ready to embrace the bold and the brave.

But let’s not overlook the sheer musicality of it all.

Let 3 isn’t just about shock value; they’re maestros of the unexpected, blending genres and breaking rules with a glee that’s infectious.

The song is a smorgasbord of sonic surprises, weaving together a soundscape that’s as intriguing as it is enjoyable. It’s a testament to their artistic audacity, a track that dances on the edge and dares to leap into the unknown.

In short, “Mama ŠČ!” is a Eurovision entry that takes risks and reaps rewards.

It’s a celebration of the unconventional, a nod to the avant-garde, and a love letter to those who dare to be different.

Let 3’s performance is a reminder that sometimes, to make a mark, you have to be willing to leave the rulebook behind—and they’ve done just that, with a loud and resounding “ŠČ!”

Let 3 – “Mama ŠČ!” – Lyrics (Original)

Mama kupila traktora
ŠČ!
Mama kupila traktora
ŠČ!
Mama kupila traktora
Trajna-nina Armagedon nona
ŠČ!

Mama kupila traktora
ŠČ!
Mama kupila traktora
ŠČ!
Mama kupila traktora
Trajna-nina Armagedon nona
ŠČ!

TRAKTORA

Mama ljubila morona
ŠČ!
Mama ljubila morona
ŠČ!
Mama ljubila morona
Trajna-nina Armagedon nona

A, b, c, č, ć, d, dž, đ, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, lj, m, n, nj, o, p, r, s, š, t, u, v, z, ž…

Mama, mama, mama
Ja se idem igrat’
Mama, idem u rat

Onaj mali psihopat
Mali podli psihopat
Krokodilski psihopat
Mama, idem u rat

TRAKTORA

Mama ljubila morona
ŠČ!
Mama ljubila morona
ŠČ!
Mama ljubila morona
Trajna-nina Armagedon nona

Onaj mali psihopat
Mali podli psihopat
Krokodilski psihopat
Mama, idem u rat

Onaj mali psihopat
Mali podli psihopat
Krokodilski psihopat
Mama, idem u rat

Mama, mama, mama

Onaj mali psihopat
Mali podli psihopat
Krokodilski psihopat
Mama, idem u rat

ŠČ!

Let 3 – “Mama ŠČ!” – Lyrics (Translated)

Mommy bought a tractor
ŠČ!
Mommy bought a tractor
ŠČ!
Mommy bought a tractor
‘Trajna-nina’ Armageddon-grandma
ŠČ!

Mommy bought a tractor
ŠČ!
Mommy bought a tractor
ŠČ!
Mommy bought a tractor
‘Trajna-nina’ Armageddon-grandma
ŠČ!

TRACTOR!

Mommy kissed the moron
ŠČ!
Mommy kissed the moron
ŠČ!
Mommy kissed the moron
‘Trajna-nina’ Armageddon-grandma

A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z…….

Mommy, mommy, mommy
I’m going to play
Mommy, I’m going to war

That little psychopath
Evil little psychopath
Alligator psychopath
Mommy, I’m going to war

TRACTOR!

Mommy kissed the moron
ŠČ!
Mommy kissed the moron
ŠČ!
Mommy kissed the moron
‘Trajna Nina’ Armageddon-grandma

That little psychopath
Evil little psychopath
Alligator psychopath
Mommy, I’m going to war

That little psychopath
Evil little psychopath
Alligator psychopath
Mommy, I’m going to war

Mommy, mommy, mommy

That little psychopath
Evil little psychopath
Alligator psychopath
Mommy, I’m going to war

ŠČ!

Final Thoughts – “Mama ŠČ!”

As “Mama ŠČ” ends and we’re trying to process everything we’ve just witnessed, we’re reminded that the most potent messages often come wrapped in satire.

Let 3’s artistic prowess turns a spotlight on the absurdity of power, painting a picture of warmongers as overgrown children playing with the fate of nations as if they were mere toys.

Through the guise of humor and repetition, they deliver a biting critique of the leaders who rattle sabers and ride tractors (apparently), all while the world watches the spectacle unfold.

In this performance, every verse is a brushstroke in a larger portrait of dissent, and each “ŠČ!” a symbol of the disdain for those who would treat war as child’s play.

Let 3 invites us to see through the grandstanding and recognize the dangerous games being played on the global stage.

As we pull back the curtain on “Mama ŠČ,” let’s not forget the power of music to challenge, mock, and inspire change.

But let us carry forward the conversation.

Share your thoughts, dissect the lyrics, and join the dialogue in the comments below. After all, it’s through these discussions that we keep the spirit of critique alive and kicking.

And don’t let the tractor’s momentum stop here—be a part of the ongoing Eurovision narrative by subscribing to the Eurovision Corgi newsletter.

Stay tuned for more insights, more music, and more coverage of the bizarre musical spectacle that we all love.